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20121205
20121213
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on the spending cuts. walmart's ceo mike duke expressed concerns about the fiscal cliff. >> the week before the election, only one-fourth, 25% of our core customers even knew what fiscal cliff meant. okay? one week after the election, it was up to 75%. now these same customers, 15% of our customers are telling us, this discussion about fiscal cliff will affect what they spend on christmas. >> that's a fascinating read on -- >> i wonder who's doing the surveying? how is that occurring? >> greeters? >> i would be curious how they know those percentages. do they ask people at the -- >> yeah. >> and can you define the fiscal cliff? i don't mean to question the methodology, it's interesting. >> just curious. >> i think that when i was in washington, i got the sense that there were just a lot of people there who actually thought romney was going to win. and there would be no fiscal cliff because romney would get together with congress, extend every single tax break and we would all live happily ever after and not worry about the deficit and not worry about the 2%. there was a kind of, well, they
's advertisers are displaying caution about spending because of the fiscal cliff. he'll be on "squawk on the street" at 11:40 eastern time. and netflix paying for exclusive rights to stream disney movies. a lot of happenings moving stocks in a big way. with pandora, analysts give pandora a pass but they keep putting out bright spots in third quarter that did come in better than expected. mobile monthization. >> this is the first company that came out and blamed the fiscal cliff. one of the few companies that would not be worried about the fiscal cliff because of great growth opportunities. could this be a competitive thing? >> i use them both. a huge fan of both. jpmorgan says it doesn't change the thesis. the theme is that they, like others, monthization and mobile continues to do well and you get guidance and morgan says it's frustrating. >> guidance was terrible. another disaster. it may be too early to buy pandora to put it in zynga groupon. groupon, i don't know if you call the deal today. it's awesome. one of three different i can do. >> you can get two in one day. >> i don't kn
stories of consumer spending starting so slow. and in part, they cite the fiscal cliff. i think if you were out there, you would get answers that would not necessarily describe it correctly. >> it's a shame it's called fiscal cliff. and called radical tax increase. it was meant to cause a recession. the government felt in its infinite wisdom that -- >> you think it's a radical tax increase? >> i think so, yeah. i think you'll notice it in your paycheck for certain. >> that's absolutely for sure. >> your first check, second paycheck, then you get the chaos that bowles mentioned. and the chaos is, wow, i have much less to spend. i didn't know this was coming. alternative minimum tax being the silent killer who really understands how much more they have to pay, check at the end of the year. do the math. >> we saw it in the consumer sentiment numbers, and what it will be when the increases actually go through. most of that decline in sentiment that we saw on friday was from households earning more than $75,000. a higher income in this survey, households felt it the most, even though it's n
right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. instead of reforming the tax code and cutting spending, the president wants to raise tax rates. but even if the president got the tax rate hike that he wanted, understand that we would continue to see trillion-dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. listen. washington's got a spending problem, not a revenue problem. if the president doesn't agree with our proposal, i believe that he's got an obligation to families and small businesses to offer a plan of his own, a plan that can pass both chambers of the congress. we're ready and eager to talk to the pretty about such a plan. >> speaker, you did speak with the pretsident earlier this wee. can you talk about that call? also we understand that he's making clear that it's got to be increasing rates for the wealthy or no deal. are you willing to give a little bit, maybe not all the way to 39.6%? >> it was -- the phone call was pleasant, but it was just more of the same. the conversations that the staff had yesterday. just more of the same. it's time for the president, if he's serious, t
with a deal on the fiscal cliff? why? because it represents the beginning of american austerity. higher taxes in the long run, spending cuts in the long run, that is a headwind for stocks. not a tailwind. i know everybody's excited about the deal being made. but a substantial minority believes that's a deal for the fed stocks. the general consensus down here, current purchases, $85 billion, is going to continue. instead of $45 billion from operation twist, operation twist goes away, and you go to outright purchases of treasuries. and you continue with that $40 billion in mortgage-backed security purchases. the $85 billion, they're doing right now, continues in a slightly different form. you guys, we're talking about aig. just two observations on aig. you'll notice here, it looks like to me they're not repurchasing any of their shares. they're dumping a huge amount of shares on the market. aig isn't actually buying it back. that's a signed of strength for the company. the other interesting thing is, the losses on sandy have been coming in recently. aig gave $2 billion in pre-tax losses. you in
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5